Treasured Lands


We just got this beautiful book from the library and have been looking through it. If you love our national parks you should try to find it! 



The title is Treasured Lands: A Photographic Odyssey Through America’s National Parks. It is hardcover and quite heavy. There are 456 pages of amazing photos. QT Luong worked on Ken Burns and Dayton Duncan’s documentary The National Parks America’s Best Idea. 




I love this part of the description: “In an odyssey that spanned more than 20 years and 300 visits, Luong focused his lenses on iconic landscapes and rarely seen remote views, presenting his journey in this sumptuous array of more than 500 breathtaking images.

Accompanying the collection of scenic masterpieces is a guide that includes maps of each park, as well as extended captions that detail where and how the photographs were made. Designed to inspire visitors to connect with the parks and invite photographers to re-create these landscapes, the guide also provides anecdotal observations that give context to the pictures and convey the sheer scope of Luong’s extraordinary odyssey.”

Dry Tortugas National Park

The Dry Tortugas are seven islands located nearly 70 miles west of Key West. You can take the official concesionare ferry (the Yankee Freedom), a seaplane or your own boat to get there. Most visitors plan a day trip by ferry. The ferry costs about $175 per person, but check during the year for coupons. They sometimes give $25-$50 off. You should know, the Yankee Freedom ferry is very fast and several people were seasick on our trip. We took Bonine just in case and were fine. We stood out in the front of the ferry for most of the trip back and forth. I saw a huge sea turtle! You can also camp for $8 per night. The Yankee Freedom ferry will carry your gear for you. The campsites were pretty nice and some were shaded by trees. They were steps from a beautiful beach.

The Island you will visit on your day trip is Garden Key. Most of the island is taken up by Fort Jefferson. This fort was built from 1846-1875. It was built to protect an important shipping channel. In 1825 a lighthouse was built to warn vessels about the dangerous reefs. There are many shipwrecks all around the islands. The fort was also used as a prison during the Civil War. Audobon loved the islands for bird watching and Hemingway for sport fishing.

There were two tours offered of the fort. A 30 minute one and one that took an hour and 1/2. Craig and I just did a self guided tour. There are apps you can download for this. We toured the fort for about half an hour-45 minutes, got our national park stamps in the visitor center and then went snorkeling with our new masks! We rinsed off, changed and had lunch on the ferry. Then we went back out to take more pictures. I also got a new t-shirt in the gift shop. It takes about 2 hours and 15 minutes to get to Garden Key by ferry. We left at 8am from Key West and got back about 5pm. We did not feel rushed, but would love to spend more time on the islands camping for our next trip.

It was a great visit and our 18th national park! Craig and I were celebrating our 20th anniversary and we had a wonderful time in the Florida Keys and the three Florida national parks. More posts about our Florida road trip soon!

National Park and Nature Quotes

“National parks are the best idea we ever had. Absolutely American, absolutely democratic, they reflect us at our best rather than our worst.” -Wallace Stegner

“If future generations are to remember us with gratitude rather than contempt, we must leave them something more than the miracles of technology. We must leave them a glimpse of the world as it was in the beginning, not just after we got through with it.” -Lyndon B. Johnson

“Wilderness itself is the basis of all our civilization. I wonder if we have enough reverence for life to concede to wilderness the right to live on?” – Margaret (Mardy) Murie

“There are no words that can tell the hidden spirit of the wilderness, that can reveal its mystery, its melancholy, and its charm.” – Theodore Roosevelt 

“We who are gathered here may represent a particularly elite, not of money and power, but of concern for the earth for the earth’s sake.”- Ansel Adams

“The more civilized man becomes, the more he needs and craves a great background of forest wildness, to which he may return like a contrite prodigal from the husks of an artificial life.”- Ellen Burns Sherman

“It is imperative to maintain portions of the wilderness untouched so that a tree will rot where it falls, a waterfall will pour its curve without generating electricity, a trumpeter swan may float on uncontaminated water — and moderns may at least see what their ancestors knew in their nerves and blood.”- Bernard De Voto

“I felt my lungs inflate with the onrush of scenery—air, mountains, trees, people. I thought, ‘This is what it is to be happy.’”- Sylvia Plath

“This grand show is eternal. It is always sunrise somewhere; the dew is never all dried at once; a shower is forever falling; vapor is ever rising. Eternal sunrise, eternal sunset, eternal dawn and gloaming, on sea and continents and islands, each in its turn, as the round earth rolls.” – John Muir

“But especially he loved to run in the dim twilight of the summer midnights, listening to the subdued and sleepy murmurs of the forest, reading signs and sounds as a man may read a book, and seeking for the mysterious something that called—called, waking or sleeping, at all times, for him to come.”- Jack London

“Live in the sunshine, swim the sea, drink the wild air.”- Ralph Waldo Emerson

“May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, dangerous, leading to the most amazing view.”- Edward Abbey

“The earth is what we all have in common.” – Wendell Berry

“There is a pleasure in the pathless woods,
There is a rapture on the lonely shore,
There is society, where none intrudes,
By the deep Sea, and music in its roar:
I love not Man the less, but Nature more.”
—Lord Byron

 


Uncle Tom’s Trail-Yellowstone National Park

If you love waterfalls, do not miss Uncle Tom’s Trail in Yellowstone National Park. You descend 328 steps on a steel staircase 3/4 of the way into the Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone. When you get to the bottom you have an amazing view of Lower Yellowstone Falls.  Just remember you have to go back up! Since you are already at 8,000 feet elevation, you may want to take it slow. There are some benches along the way.

Uncle Tom's Trail Down

Lower Yellowstone Falls

The sign at the trail head tells you a little bit about H.F. Richardson. His nickname was “Uncle Tom” and he built a trail to the canyon floor in 1898. People would have to climb down ropes and rope ladders to reach the bottom. Then they would have a picnic lunch and climb back up. I can not imagine climbing in the long dresses and skirts of the early 1900’s! Let us know how you like the hike/climb if you do it.

Uncle Tom's Staircase

Preview Yellowstone Treasures below!

Yellowstone Treasures

 

The National Parks: America’s Best Idea

Have you seen the great PBS show The National Parks: America’s Best Idea? It was a 6 episode series produced by Ken Burns and Dayton Duncan that came out several years ago. You can rent the DVDs from your library or watch it on Netflix. Craig and I spent some time watching the episodes and it made us want to see our National Parks even more!

I  especially loved the story of Margaret and Edward Gehrke from Lincoln, Nebraska. For 30 years the Gehrkes traveled to every National Park that existed at the time by train and car. They started in 1915 at the Grand Canyon.  Margaret wrote about the trips in her journals and Edward took many photographs. Margaret put the pictures in scrapbooks, and they were given to the Nebraska State Historical Society. I have some of their photographs on my National Park Pinterest page.

Here is one from Rocky Mountain National Park-their favorite. (From PBS.)