Yellowstone National Park Geysers and Thermal Features

At Yellowstone National Park there are around 500 geysers and over 10,000 thermal features! There are more geysers at Yellowstone than anywhere else on Earth. One of the best walks to see many of the pools, springs and geysers is the Upper Geyser Basin right near the Old Faithful Inn. I love this map of the area:

upper-geyser-basin-map

When we visited in 2014, Craig and I walked the whole Upper Geyser Basin, past Morning Glory Pool, through the woods to Biscuit Basin. It took about three hours round trip. We stopped to take pictures, videos and to sit near the Firehole River for a snack. Be sure and take your bear spray. We did not see many people past Morning Glory Pool.

There will be geyser eruption times posted at the Old Faithful Inn and the Visitor Center. There is also an NPS App you can download that will give you several possible eruption times. Sometimes, you will luck out while walking and see a group of “Geyser Gazers” that may be waiting by a certain thermal feature. They keep the rangers up to date on what might be ready to erupt. We got to see Beehive Geyser shoot 200 feet in the air! The rangers also give free walks and talks around the geyser basins during the day and evenings. 

Do not forget Norris Geyser Basin, Black Sand Basin, Midway Geyser Basin, the Lower Geyser Basin and Firehole Lake Drive. West Thumb Geyser Basin is also unique because it is next to Yellowstone Lake. I love the Fishing Cone hot spring where in the past people would catch a fish in the cold lake and then cook it in the spring!  Be careful! When you get past Morning Glory Pool, you are able to walk right next to some of the thermal features. The boardwalks can also get very crowded at peak times. Near Grand Prismatic Spring was usually packed. Stay on marked trails. What geysers have you seen erupt at Yellowstone?  Sometimes you will catch a surprise eruption!

 


The Crow’s Nest at Old Faithful Inn

High in the rafters at the Old Faithful Inn in Yellowstone National Park, is an enchanting place called the Crow’s Nest. It is said that Robert Reamer, the architect that built the Inn designed it from a childhood fantasy. Bands used to play here for guests high in the air. It is 76 feet up and looks like an amazing tree house.

When I was researching our Yellowstone trip, I came across info on the Crow’s Nest. It turns out you can call the Old Faithful Inn bell desk, and if there is space during your stay, they will take you up to the Crow’s Nest and the roof of the Old Faithful Inn for flag lowering. I was lucky to read this in May when they first opened for the season. I was able to get a spot for our August trip!

We met at the bell desk at 6pm as requested. The bell person that we went up with told us another family might be joining us and was that OK. We said sure. We waited a bit more for the family to show up, but only the mother decided to go. (Wow, who would turn this down? Maybe someone was afraid of heights!) Then we set off for the stairs. They keep the stairs to this area locked for safety.

People were watching and wondering why we got to go past the gates. It pays to do some research ahead of time.

The Crow’s Nest was amazing, but the real honor was getting to lower the United States flag and state flags on the roof of the Inn.

This would be a great thing to surprise someone with on your trip. It is pretty high up, and the railings are low so be prepared. It can be windy as well. The view of the Upper Geyser Basin and Old Faithful is stunning.