George Grant the First Chief Photographer of the National Park Service

 

After learning about National Parks Magazine, Craig and I got several issues from the library. The fall 2015 issue had an article about George Grant, the first chief photographer of the National Park Service. I had seen several of Grant’s photographs before, but now I know who took them. You may recognize this one of Superintendent Horace Albright taken in Yellowstone National Park.

The article says that during Grant’s “quarter century as the national parks’ principal staff photographer, he crisscrossed the country numerous times, traveling more than 140,000 miles to capture more than 30,000 images from nearly all the national parks, monuments, and historic sites that existed at the time.”  One of the photographs that struck me was Fort Jefferson in the Dry Tortugas National Park. It looks the same so many years later!

If you would like to see more of George Grant’s work, as well as many other national park photographs, this is where I searched on the NPS website. Here is an article about Grant.

Shown is a view of the Grand Canyon looking west, Grand Canyon National Park, June 19, 1930. National Park Service photograph by George A. Grant.

Shown is a view of the Grand Canyon looking west, Grand Canyon National Park, June 19, 1930. National Park Service photograph by George A. Grant.

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Capitol Reef

Glacier National Park

Glacier National Park

Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone

Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone

The National Parks: America’s Best Idea

Have you seen the great PBS show The National Parks: America’s Best Idea? It was a 6 episode series produced by Ken Burns and Dayton Duncan that came out several years ago. You can rent the DVDs from your library or watch it on Netflix. Craig and I spent some time watching the episodes and it made us want to see our National Parks even more!

I  especially loved the story of Margaret and Edward Gehrke from Lincoln, Nebraska. For 30 years the Gehrkes traveled to every National Park that existed at the time by train and car. They started in 1915 at the Grand Canyon.  Margaret wrote about the trips in her journals and Edward took many photographs. Margaret put the pictures in scrapbooks, and they were given to the Nebraska State Historical Society. I have some of their photographs on my National Park Pinterest page.

Here is one from Rocky Mountain National Park-their favorite. (From PBS.)