Grinnell Glacier Hike

If you visit Glacier National Park, the Grinnell Glacier hike is a must do! It is a moderately strenuous 11.6 mile round trip with over 1,800 feet of elevation gain. You can cut out 3.4 miles of the hike by taking two classic wood boats across Swiftcurrent Lake and Lake Josephene. Book them way ahead to get a spot. The hike opens fully towards the end of July. Otherwise, you may not be able to go all the way due to snow. Check the NPS site for updates.

Craig and I went on the ranger led hike and had a great time. It was tough climbing the first part of the hike, and we were glad to have poles going up and back down. Our ranger David stopped every so often to give the group a rest and to give slower hikers a chance to catch up. We learned a lot about the geology of the park, saw three glaciers, amazing wildflowers, walked through waterfalls, saw wildlife like Bighorn Sheep and 1.5 billion year old Stromatolites.

Take plenty of water on the hike and wear a hat and good hiking shoes/boots. You may want to order a box lunch from your hotel the night before and take a small soft-sided cooler with you. There is a picnic area along the way with benches and pretty clean pit toilets. It is a hard hike, but so worth the effort. It is probably my favorite hike I have done so far. It is hard to show how enormous Grinnell Glacier is with pictures. It is also amazing to see how far it has receded. Please go and experience it while you still can! 

Here is a great site for hiking Glacier. This site gives you details on the Grinnell Glacier hike. 

Death in Yellowstone (and Other National Parks)

The past few weeks several very sad but avoidable accidents have happened at Yellowstone National Park. In May, a lady taking a picture of an Eagle stepped into the road and got hit by a car. On Tuesday, a pair of siblings from Oregon walked 225 yards off the boardwalks in Norris Geyser Basin and one slipped and fell into a hot spring. The water temperatures in Norris are the hottest in the park and range from 199 to 449 degrees. The day before, a 13 year old was being carried by his father as they walked off the designated trail in the Upper Geyser Basin. They slipped and got burned in a hot spring. Many signs are posted at the geyser basins warning visitors to stay on the boardwalks and marked paths. Information packets in different languages are also handed out when you enter the parks.

Rangers and Yellowstone National Park Superintendent Dan Wenk have said that park visitation is already up 60% this year. It is the 100th Anniversary of the National Park Service and with cheaper gas, social media interest and unrest overseas, people want to travel to the parks. 

There have been a lot of “crazy tourist” news stories already coming from the parks. I am sure you read or heard about the two tourists putting a Bison calf in their car to save it because they thought it was cold. Or High On Life, a group of Canadian tourists with a clothing line that blatantly ignored several National Park rules and then posted the pictures of themselves doing it to Instagram and Facebook. They have warrants issued for their arrests, but made it back to Canada. Then you have the woman petting a Bison– a wild animal that weighs over a ton and can move at 40mph. Park warnings say to keep 100 yards from Bears and Wolves and 25 yards from Bison and Elk. This woman also made news by approaching an Elk too closely.

In Glacier National Park a young man just died jumping into a pool of water in Running Eagle Falls. A climber died in Zion in March and last year there was an awful accident in Keyhole Canyon.  The last time Craig and I visited Yellowstone in 2014, a young girl fell at The Grand Canyon of the Yellowstone the day we were there. Last year, a park employee made news when a bear attacked him while he was out alone running or walking without bear spray. On Monday a man fell while taking pictures in Acadia National  Park.

Throughout history accidents have happened in our wild places. Some are avoidable and some are due to weather and nature. I for one am glad there are still so many wild places left in this country and I hope they stay that way. Some great books to read before your trips are Death in Yellowstone, Off the Wall: Death in Yosemite and Over the Edge: Death in Grand Canyon. There are also a few other parks with books like these. They will give you a new found respect for the parks and the people that have to try and rescue visitors that make often fatal mistakes.


If you are visiting any National Parks during the 100th anniversary of the National Park Service, do some research before you go, read the information and warnings at the parks, respect the animals in their home and respect the fragile ecosystems.  If you plan to hike, carry water and bear spray or join a Ranger led hike. Too many are carving and spray painting rocks, leaving trash everywhere and not following warnings. Please do not ruin it for those of us that love and respect these places. Go and have an amazing time and be an ambassador for our parks!